Food Feature Saturday

Since I didn’t have anything exciting to really post about Friday, I didn’t post anything.

Sorry loyal followers.

However, I did fight to visit the famous farmer’s market in Soulard on Saturday. It is one huge place!

They had EVERYTHING from fresh cherries and garden-grown broccoli, to home-grown beef and home-made pastas (St. Louis has a really great Italian area).

It all looked so good, I might have purchased some yummy sweetcorn and a watermelon…

What’s the word? You might have guessed. It’s Farmer’s Market.

Since there really is no definition of a farmer’s market on Webster, we will combine the two with a basic mathematical theory.

Farmer + Market = Farmer’s Market. 

Farmer- person who cultivates land or crops or raises animals.

Market- A public place where a market is held; especially : a place where provisions are sold at wholesale or a retail establishment usually of a specified kind.

Going to the farmer’s market is tradition. Growing up, our small North Missouri town had folks who would set up stands by the courthouse on the square and sell sweet corn, melons and sometimes jams and jellies. However, the Soulard market was much bigger than the one at home. Much, much bigger.

It is a three-day market which begins on Wednesday and runs through Saturday. I caught the tail-end of the market and there were still several vendors. I bought my corn and watermelon both for $5, which is a great deal. Grocery stores in Mo usually charge $5 for the watermelon alone.

Needless to say, I will be going back. Next time for some peaches and broccoli.

However, the Soulard market isn’t the only one in St. Louis. There are several in the area. I went to the Kirkwood market a few weeks ago and found the biggest blackberries I have seen in awhile. Blackberries taste really yummy in the summer too, you know.

Aside from the great selection of produce, a farmer’s market is a great place to meet the folks who raised the food. They can answer questions about how it is grown, where they bought the seeds and how long it took to harvest the sweet corn on the shelf.

Agri-Word wants to know if you like going to the farmer’s market and why? Share and your responses could be featured in next week’s Food Feature Friday.

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Definition: Organic

Organic
Relating to, yielding, dealing in, or involving the use of food produced with the use of feed or fertilizer of plant or animal origin without employment of chemically formulated fertilizers, growth stimulants, antibiotics, or pesticides.
Organic is a word on a lot of minds right now when buying food. Do you eat organic or know how to tell if your food is 100%?

Follow the conversations on Twitter.

Gardening

Due to the warm weather, defining garden seems necessary. Webster has three ways to define the word. 

Garden plot of ground where herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables are cultivated: A rich well-cultivated region, and a container planted with usually a variety of small plants.

I was in North Missouri this week and I played around the farm. The farm is doing so well for an early spring. In fact, it’s been so nice that my mother took time Saturday to work in her garden. This is no ordinary, small garden. When my mother gardens, she goes to town.

Here is what she starts with every year. Do you see all of the weeds growing?

After she plants what she wants in the garden, she waits for it to grow. By mid-summer the garden is filled with wildflowers and some produce. There is some thyme, lavender and mint herbs, too.

Having a garden like this takes a lot of work. While I was growing up, my mother strived worked in her garden (my sibling and I too) all summer pulling weeds, watering flowers and cleaning out the garden pond.

Despite all of the work, this garden is my mother’s love and passion. She laid the brick patio from bricks she found in an old farm house up the road. We gathered at least 100 stones from the side of the road for the pathway you see, and she re-painted an old farm outhouse for her potting shed.

To be honest, I was never a fan of working in the garden, but as I get older I really appreciate all of the hard work that goes into having that area to grow food and flowers.

Have you noticed how gardens are becoming more popular these days? Folks garden for many reasons. Some do it to learn how their food is grown and some people garden just because it’s relaxing. People like to talk about their gardens, too. One Montana farm gal shares her experiences gardening in a blog.

There are also many different kinds of gardens. There are big gardens and little gardens (I even consider crop farming a form of large scale gardening). Gardens for food or just wildflowers. Gardens that use natural fertilizer or store-bought. Round-up or non. The possibilities are endless.

Do you garden? If so, what do you grow? Agri-Word would like you to share pictures of your garden or field during planting time and a little story.